Dental Tips to Start the School Year with a Smile

With the new school year fast approaching the following back-to-school dental tips for parents are sure to help your child start the school year with a healthy smile, and keep it that way all year long.

Preventing decay starts at home, so the more child-friendly your dental supplies, the more your child will love keeping up with their oral hygiene routine.

Establish a Back-to-School Dental Routine (and Make it Fun!)

Children (and adults!) should brush their teeth twice a day for two minutes to maintain good oral hygiene. Children under the age of 8 should have their toothbrushing supervised. Children under the age of 8 lack fine motor skills needed to brush their teeth effectively, so it’s important for parents to help. Establish a fun morning and evening routine that allows you to help your younger child. It is recommended that children over the age of 3years, use toothpaste containing between 1,350-1,500 ppm fluoride and to not rinse after brushing.

Pack Healthy Lunches (and a Water Bottle)

As you pack your child’s lunch, remember that sugar is added to many food products. Check food labels for added sugar and by swapping sugary foods with healthy, whole foods like crunchy vegetables, pieces of fruit and hard cheeses you can reduce the risk of decay developing in your children’s teeth. You will also want to skip crackers and chips since these foods contain simple starches that break down and get sticky, which can also cause decay. Replacing juices, sports drinks and fizzy drinks with plain water will reduce the risk of decay further and also the risk of erosion (which is a form of tooth wear caused by acid in the diet) which is dramatically on the increase in children.

 

Schedule a Back-to-School Dental Exam at Broad Street Dental Practice

Are you ready to start the school year with a smile? Our experienced dentists at Broad Street Dental Practice are experienced in paediatric dentistry, friendly, and welcoming to kids. contact us today to request back-to-school-dental exams for your toddler, child or teen.

Hereford

Broad Street Dental Surgery

 

Implant Surgical Guide

A surgical guide as the name suggests serves as a guide to place implants accurately in 3 dimensions i.e. bucco-lingual, messiah-distal and apiece-coronal.

Here I am showing a simple surgical guide that has been produced from an initial wax up (there are more accurate guides available). It is constructed of hard acrylic and can also has barium sulphate incorporated into it so it can double as a radiographic stent.

With the guide in place, the long axis of the teeth are marked a small pilot hole is made in the centre of the tooth and old implant drills can then be used to enlarge the guide window. A window can also be made in the buccal aspect of the guide to aid vision and insertion of the drills in the mouth.

This can be worn by a pt during a CBCT to confirm the correct angulation and position of the final restoration.

surgical guide

http://www.broadstreetdentalsurgery.com

Andrew Farr

FDI – Implant Retained Dentures

Managing the edentulous patient can be at times, very difficult. Following extraction of the dentition bone is remodelled and resorbed, muscles and ligament insertions become closer to residual ridges. This can in turn lead to an unstable and unretentive denture due to a lack of bony support.

When treatment planning for the edentulous patient, it is useful to classify the edentulous ridge. Ridge classification can aid both the dentist and patient in communicating any difficulties and the likelihood of a successful outcome.

3b. Adaption of Cawood & Howell classification with explanation (1).compressed

The optimum conventional dentures should be both aesthetic and functional with good fit and stability. The McGill consensus statement 2002 and York Consensus statement 2009 say that the “Minimum standard of care” in the edentulous mandible is two implant retained dentures. Working in both the private sector and primary care/community sector I find the both statement of little use. From my experience the patients who can afford two implants tend to be well educated and well informed regarding diet, oral hygiene and are regular dental attendees – they are less likely to be edentulous. Those in need are less likely to be able to afford two implants and the prosthesis.

For a mandibular implant retained denture – a minimum of two implants should be placed and four in the maxilla. The ideal position in the mandible would be the canine region and in the maxilla it would be the canine and second premolar region allowing for adequate bone and other anatomical features.

Locators, bars and milled bars can be used to improve retention, stability and support. These are a good option if an optimally made denture is still unretentive or is lacking support.

At Broad Street Dental Surgery we can provide dental implants to aid and improve the support of dentures as well as replacing single and multiple spaces.

implants1
Tissue level implants with locator attachments in situ

Dentist Andrew Farr 

Broad Street Dental Surgery

 

Foundation in Implant Dentistry Part-1

February 2017.

This was the first part of the FID course held annual by the ITI (International Team for Implantology) and Straumann. The course is being held at Crawley (quite a journey from Hereford) and was easily accessible.

The first module focused on Assessment and Treatment planning in Implant Dentistry. By comparing implants to other restorative techniques, survival rates, cost and biological implications and mechanical factors. It was clear from the outset that although this is a course aimed at implant dentistry that it would be foolhardy to be solely focused on placing implants as many of our patients would not be prime candidates for the provision of implants. Indeed we spent a few hours looking at cases that were not suitable for implants due to medical history, age, current periodontal status, bone support available and more! As someone once said – “Fail to prepare, prepare to fail.”

The course looks at using ITI’s SAC classification, which is an assessment tool of the potential difficulty and risk of a case. It uses a traffic light system and serves as a guide in both case selection and treatment planning.

S – Straight forward – low difficulty and low risk

A – Advanced – moderate difficulty and moderate risk

C -Complex – high difficulty and high risk

As this is the beginning of the “Implant Journey” for myself I will be looking at placing implants in the “straight forward” patient. These cases are generally in the premolar/molar region where aesthetics are less of an issue and ideally situated in a bounded saddle so that stresses on the abutment are less. It is recommended that we use the tissue level implants as our starting point.

The big advantage of the ITI/Straumann FID course is the mentorship scheme. Each student is provided with a mentor who has a vast amount of experience and will guide me through the treatment planning phases, consent through to placing implants and maintenance. This will also allow me to develop at my own speed and gives time to select appropriate patients to continue my training.

The next part of the course focuses on single tooth implant placement.

Andrew Farr

http://www.broadstreetdentalsurgery.com

Image result for iti implant